Let’s Go Big In 2020 And Beyond

In most American cities, bike and walk advocates beg for validation and funding like a “charity case”, and end up getting acknowledged and funded as such, resulting in insufficient or piecemeal infrastructure. We commonly see bike lanes that abruptly end, unprotected bike lanes that don’t offer leading bicycle intervals or leading pedestrian intervals (LPIs and LBIs), or safe left turns, and painted lines “that put cyclists between fast-moving traffic and parked cars with doors that capriciously swing open”, so only experienced riders will brave them, and discouraging new riders. This kind of bike and walk design and implementation continues to give drivers the sense of entitlement that roads are intended for them, and discourages people from riding bikes, scooters, and walking, thereby creating more traffic congestion perpetuating the inherent safety, health, and environmental issues.

As advocates for safe, complete streets, do we dare to go big to make environmental, social, and safety gains we hope to achieve?  If American bike and walk advocates are “pitching ourselves as a niche, special-interest group”, we are “tacitly agreeing that cars are and should be the dominant mode of transportation…”

The auto industry has dominated since the 1930s by promoting plans for highways and streets for cars.  Asbury Park is a 1.4 mile square city, where we have envisioned a plan for biking and walking, a network of infrastructure that can be a model for cities all over the US. Let’s do it big. Onward to 2020 and beyond!

Why We Need to Dream Bigger Than Bike Lanes

In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

TERENIG TOPJIAN
A cyclist rides on the bike lane in the Mid Market neighborhood during Bike to Work Day in San Francisco, California May 14, 2015. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith –
Protected bike lanes are often the most ambitious component of reform proposals. They should be a mere starting point. Robert Galbraith/ReutersOur current model is to beg for twigs        

“More often than not, bike infrastructure is created reactively. Typically in response to a collision or near collision with a car, an individual or advocacy group identifies a single route that needs better infrastructure. We gather community support and lobby local officials for the desired change, trying as hard as we can to ask for the cheapest, smallest changes so that our requests will be seen as realistic.

What’s the problem with this model?

It’s like imagining a bridge and asking for twigs—useless, unable to bear any meaningful weight, easily broken. And it’s treating bike infrastructure like a hopeless charity case.

This makes bike infrastructure seem like a small, special-interest demand that produces no real results in terms of shifting to sustainable transportation, and it makes those giving up road space and tax dollars feel as though they are supporting a hopeless charity.

But when roads, highways, and bridges are designed and built, they aren’t done one neighborhood at a time, one city-council approval at a time. We don’t build a few miles of track, or lay down some asphalt wherever there is “local support” and then leave 10-mile gaps in between.”

Read it:

We need to go big.

Subscribe: Scooter Share in Asbury Park

New Electric Scooter Share Program Will Launch In Asbury Park

A new electric scooter share program will launch soon in Asbury Park.

By Tom Davis, Patch Staff 

A new electric scooter share program will launch soon in Asbury Park.

The program will launch on July 24.

The program includes up to 250 scooters stationed at 30 locations around Asbury Park for riders 18 years and older.

Scooters will be available from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. every day at a cost of $1 plus $0.15 per minute.

Users will download the Spin app to their mobile phone to set up an account, find a map of scooter locations, pay for sessions and unlock scooters for use with a QR code scan. Scooters must be operated on City streets in bike lanes when available, and not on sidewalks.

Read more:

https://patch.com/new-jersey/asbury-park/new-electric-scooter-share-program-will-launch-asbury-park

News: Electric Scooters And Valet Parking!

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition says YES to mobility options like scooters, which will get people out of cars, reduce congestion in the city, and provide transportation for people who don’t own cars .

Asbury Park Transportation News!


The City of Asbury Park released its Summer 2019 transportation updates Friday.

“This summer, the City launches an electric scooter program, downtown receives a valet parking service, an additional parking payment app becomes available, and the new Guest Parking Permit program was introduced,” a written news statement said.

Read more:  http://asburyparksun.com/electric-scooters-valet-parking-on-the-horizon/

 

 

Asbury Pod: Great Interview with Asbury Park Transportation Manager

Asbury Pod episode #3, Transportation, starting around 19:00 ’til around 1:02:00.  Asbury Park Transportation Manager, Mike Manzella, Deputy Mayor Amy Quinn, and Joe Walsh get down into issues like parking, scooters, how to make a walkable and bikeable city, transit, and the rising numbers of automobile/pedestrian and cyclist fatalities across the US.

Thanks for a great in-depth interview!

Listen:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/asbury-pod/e/62425309

Well-Known Musician Ken Sorensen “Stringbean” Says Streets Are For People

Kenny Sorensen, the talented and well-known musician has been advocating for safe infrastructure for bicycling for years. This is his letter to the editor of the Asbury Park Press. A road diet can be the solution. “While New Jersey traffic fatalities have declined slightly, pedestrian and bicycle deaths have sharply increased. This is a trend nationwide. More pedestrians and bicyclists are being killed and injured by cars than ever before.” #slowthecars Learn more…

Public streets not just for car owners: Sorensen

Ken Sorensen Jan. 11, 2019

Public streets should be for everyone, not just car owners. Our friends in Asbury Park Complete Streets have been successful in implementing a “road diet” on Main Street in Asbury Park. This current project converts four lanes of traffic to a three-lane configuration with a turning lane and bike lanes. It’s much safer for motorists and pedestrians. A road diet is a design tool that reverses six decades of road design focused solely on cars at the expense of pedestrians’ safety and general quality of life.

Read more…

https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2019/01/11/pedestrian-bike-safety-neptune/2540030002/

Springwood Ave: Making A Place People Want To Be

“Urbanism at it’s core is connective and fluid…”

Renaissance Village has accepted applications and residential spaces are being occupied. The objective of the redevelopment of Springwood Ave is to create an affordable place where people live, work, shop, and visit. The intention is to create a truly walkable and livable, vibrant part of the city, with commitment from the city and  investment. The redevelopment of Springwood Ave connects it with Memorial Drive, the Transit Center, and Main Street, making it a great example of revitalization, connecting it “seamlessly to the surrounding area” and the rest of the city.

The Failure of “Just Add Water” Urbanism

 by Arian Horbovetz

“Urbanism, at its core, is connective and fluid, creating places where people want to be, not simply via neighborhood revitalization, but by blending that localized revitalization seamlessly into the surrounding area. There must be a sort of “transition” from one area to the next that guides the resident or visitor gently, instead of assuming that a large-scale new-urbanist creation can suddenly spur arteries of growth in inhospitable urban deserts.”

“…successfully landing commercial tenants and creating an intended neighborhood effect is based largely on the overall health of the environment in which they are built. Mixed-use developments are, inherently, intended to welcome and amplify walkability.”