A Great Conversation About Mobility In Asbury Park

The Newest Episode Of Asbury Pod: “Mobility”

Listen to the most recent episode of Asbury Pod, “Mobility” with hosts Deputy Mayor of Asbury Park,Amy Quinn, and Joe Walsh. A great interview with Mike Manzella, Asbury Park Transportation Manager and Deputy City Manager, and me, Polli Schildge!

A wonderful discussion about the evolution of Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition, the Main Street Rt 71 reconfiguration, open streets, bicycling, explaining road diets, bike lanes, sharrows, the history of trolleys, and how open streets are working in Asbury Park. Learn about the focus on accessibility, equity, and the future of mobility in AP.
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Tri City News Publisher Supports Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition Road Diet!

🙌AP city council was willing to change their position after APCSC persistently presented the benefits of a road diet. After 18 months they voted unanimously to accept the NJDOT Main Street plan, including the road diet. The work is almost complete, and is leading to continued improvements to make Asbury Park a truly walkable and bikeable city, and safe for everyone to get around, especially the most vulnerable.
🙌The Publisher of Tri City News was also willing to change his position from calling APCSC “Wild Eyed Fanatics”, to becoming one of our biggest supporters!
 
Read more on this site about road diets and reconfigurations all over the world!

Road Diet Support From Tri City News!

Pick up a copy of Tri City today!

Big thanks to Dan Jacobsen Publisher of Tri City News for an in-depth, informative, and supportive article about the reconfiguration of Main Street.

Part of the article quoted from Polli Schildge, APCSC committee member:
As you drive on Main Street, “traffic calming” is what you’re experiencing.  It’s the driver response to a street that feels narrower, and where there’s a need to be more aware. Drivers seem to have adapted, and they’re driving more safely, even though it isn’t pretty. Right now Main Street is in the process of repair, with obstacles like barrels, trucks, and potholes which “calm” traffic. When the project is finished there will be a calmer flow of traffic, because of only one north and one south lane, bike lanes, and a center turning lane. Drivers will find that they’re getting to their destinations without losing time, and without needing to zoom traffic light to traffic light.
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A small city like Asbury Park is perfectly positioned to implement infrastructure like the Main Street Road Diet, and to adopt The Asbury Park Plan for Walking and Biking, which Doug references.  We’re at #peakcar. #toomanycars. With bikeshare, jitneys, electric cars, and other transit options Asbury Park can be a model city for getting around safely walking, biking, and with or…without a car. 

For many years, much of the focus in engineering city streets has been how to efficiently move cars. Asbury Park is among other forward thinking cities globally where we’ve realized that safety, and PEOPLE should be the focus. Cars are often needed to get to destinations, but within the city there are much better, healthier, and safer ways to get around, especially for many residents who do not own cars at all.

We’re so fortunate to have Transportation Manager, Mike Manzella and advocate members in Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition who can help educate, and partner with residents, businesses and police to make this city truly walkable and bikeable.  
Stay tuned for more ways in which Asbury Park will be creating better ways for people to move about the city without a car. 

Road Diet Explained: Video

In some states the DOT may show a lack vision in implementation of infrastructure for modes of transportation other than cars. Iowa is different. Check out the Iowa DOT video explaining the benefits of a road diet. Yes, Asbury Park will have a road diet on Main Street when the NJDOT project is completed. And yes, Asbury Park, as it’s been pointed out to us again and again is “unique and different”, and “we’re a city not a town”, etc. Whatever our distinctions, a road diet can work to reduce crashes and improve traffic flow with examples on thoroughfares all over the United States.  Even the police and fire chiefs in the video  admit that it works.  *Our only objection is that the police chief refers to “accidents”, rather than the preferred, and accurate term “crashes”.

Iowa DOT Helps Educate Citizens on the Value of a Road Diet

January 23, 2019

To give credit where credit is due: The Iowa DOT—which we’ve acknowledged before for forward thinking—clearly has some people who get the difference between how a high-speed road should function and how an urban street should function. But not just that: they’re also helping educate Iowans about that difference, with this video illustrating the benefits of a 4-to-3 lane conversion, a common type of road diet which turns a 4-lane street into a 2-lane street with a center turn lane—almost always slowing traffic and improving safety and economic vitality alike.

Watch the video!

https://www.strongtowns.org/journal/2019/1/23/iowa-dot-helps-educate

Well-Known Musician Ken Sorensen “Stringbean” Says Streets Are For People

Kenny Sorensen, the talented and well-known musician has been advocating for safe infrastructure for bicycling for years. This is his letter to the editor of the Asbury Park Press. A road diet can be the solution. “While New Jersey traffic fatalities have declined slightly, pedestrian and bicycle deaths have sharply increased. This is a trend nationwide. More pedestrians and bicyclists are being killed and injured by cars than ever before.” #slowthecars Learn more…

Public streets not just for car owners: Sorensen

Ken Sorensen Jan. 11, 2019

Public streets should be for everyone, not just car owners. Our friends in Asbury Park Complete Streets have been successful in implementing a “road diet” on Main Street in Asbury Park. This current project converts four lanes of traffic to a three-lane configuration with a turning lane and bike lanes. It’s much safer for motorists and pedestrians. A road diet is a design tool that reverses six decades of road design focused solely on cars at the expense of pedestrians’ safety and general quality of life.

Read more…

https://www.app.com/story/opinion/columnists/2019/01/11/pedestrian-bike-safety-neptune/2540030002/

HEALTHIER ROADS IN THE NEW YEAR: Starting With A Road Diet

By now most residents of Asbury Park know of the term “road diet”. We have all experienced the bumps along the way as the work continues repairing and upgrading Main Street as we anticipate the final stage of striping the lanes. Many people are familiar with Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition’s campaign to #SlowTheCars . For the new year, our initiative is to share and educate about the health, economic and cultural benefits of a safe Main Street, and traffic calming measures throughout the city, “Complete Streets” to make streets safe for everyone, especially the most vulnerable: people who ride bikes and walk.

Let’s start here:

ENVISIONING A BETTER MAIN STREET

What is a Road Diet? Why the need for a Road Diet? Beyond The Road Diet.

New Year’s Resolutions and Your Roadways

 

Read more about it:

https://trafficlogix.com/healthier-roads-in-new-year/