Parks In Asbury Park

An article appeared in my inbox this morning, then an email appeared on the same subject: parks – a tool to evaluate accessibility to parks, and parks for teenage girls.

Asbury Park has large and lovely real estate devoted to parks, which has existed since the inception of the city. These tree-filled, “passive” parks are mostly located in only certain neighborhoods, and parks are completely lacking in others.  According to The Trust For Public Land, Asbury Park ranks 76%, meaning that 76% percent of people can walk to a park within 10 minutes. That’s not an impressive score in a tiny 1.4 mile sq. city. Boston ranks 100%. Washington 98%, Alexandria, VA is 97%, and NYC is 99%.

Over 20% of  people are unable to walk to a park within 10 minutes in Asbury Park, and existing parks are devoid of amenities for people. A park should be a destination, not just a place to pass through.

A “passive park” like the design in the master plan for Sunset Park would be a large, lovely ornament in the city. The design is intended for  strolling, or dog walking, just as it was designed in the original plan for the city in the 1870s.  It should not be designed that way in 2021.  We believe that an Asbury Park is committed to equity and inclusiveness should actively invite everyone to every park in the city.  

The underutilized Sunset Park

We need all of our existing green spaces, large and small to offer active engagement for kids, families, and elderly.  And we need more parks in every neighborhood in the city.
According to this data over 20% of people can’t walk to a park in less than 10 min in our tiny city – and we need to do something about it.
Let’s start with kids, teen girls in particular:

Teen Girls Need Better Public Spaces to Hang Out

Basketball courts, skate parks and playgrounds overlook an important demographic: teenage girls. A burgeoning design movement is trying to fix that.

 

Susannah Walker, co-founder of the newly created British charity Make Space for Girls, saw in Swing Time something that would have delighted her 17-year-old self.  “At the end of the summer holidays my friend and I ran out of money,” Walker wrote in a March post. “We had nothing to do and there was nowhere to go. So we’d go and hang out on the swings in the early evening and chat as the light slowly faded into dusk. It was better than sitting around at home.”

She highlights Swing Time to illustrate two points: One, girls love swings. And two, there aren’t enough swings made for teenage girls. “They are almost always placed with the equipment for younger children, so that if teenagers use them they are seen as invaders.”

The New Jersey Bike And Walk Summit 2021: June 1st through June 5th

 

The NJBWC Summit is New Jersey’s statewide meeting of bicycle and pedestrian advocates, elected officials and other township leaders, transportation and urban planners, bike shop owners and managers, cycling, walking, fitness and health enthusiasts and experts, recreation, trails and club leaders and others who are interested in making our state a better place to live.

Drawing on the momentum for change spurred by the pandemic, NJBWC is pleased to offer you the opportunity to learn lessons from communities that took action to open their streets to people, learn more about current Vision Zero, Complete Streets, and equitable mobility initiatives impacting your community, gain insights into different stages of trail development, learn about available public funding sources for your bike/ped projects, and identify strategies to advocate for a more bike and pedestrian friendly and therefore, more livable New Jersey.

Register for sessions at the Zoom New Jersey Bike & Walk Summit June 1st through June 5th

The final session of the Summit at 9:30am on June 5th features panelists from nine cities and towns in NJ, including Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition representative! This editor is happy to be moderating a panel again this year,  Advocates in Action Part 2: Pandemic and Beyond.

Panelists from these nine municipalities will share inspiration, ideas and implementation of ways they have worked to enable people to move about their cities and towns safely during the pandemic. They will speak about how they have engaged with city leaders, the focus on equitable access, and plans to maintain these spaces in the future, for the health of residents and visitors, and for the health of the planet.

Register for Summit sessions individually here.

Register for Summit sessions individually here.

 

Asbury Park Bicycle Patrol Unit Launches – Finally!

Community policing with officers on bikes!
We’ve been advocating for cops on bikes in Asbury Park for years. We’re very happy that our effort was finally successful. After being told variously that police bikes were somewhere in storage (previous city manager), or that we couldn’t do it because it was too expensive, or the course was at the wrong time of year…
Finally after reaching out to other municipalities with bicycle patrol, we made direct personal contact last year with the head of the Monmouth Police Academy Police Bicycle Patrol Training Course, who had great suggestions. He provided the course catalog, which was shared with AP City Manager and city leaders. Thanks to one and all!
Onward!
The city announcement of Asbury Park Bicycle patrol.

NJDOT Commemorates Asbury Park’s Main Street Road Diet

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition was created in 2015 when we learned about the proposed NJDOT reconfiguration on RT 71, Asbury Park’s Main Street. After some initial hesitancy, and much lobbying on the part of APCSC, Mayor Moor and City Council agreed to move forward with the project, which is now nearly completed. Almost all agree now, including many original naysayers, that this was a great step in enabling Asbury Park residents and visitors to walk, ride bikes, and drive more safely on Main Street, and to improve the health and economic stability of the community.
Among many documents and evidence of the effectiveness of this type of traffic calming measure was an educational piece, A Better AP Main St FINAL ROAD DIET PAPER, created by APCSC founding member Doug McQueen. It was helpful in communicating the goal of a road diet to community members and city leaders.
As an advocate for safe, equitable access for everyone in Asbury Park, I personally appreciate the ability to engage with city leaders, and NJ legislators who want the best for our city, and NJ. It was a pleasure to see and speak with Lieutenant Governor Sheila Oliver, NJDOT Commissioner Gutierrez-Scaccetti, Senator Vin Gopal, NJ Representatives Eric Houghtaling, and Joann Downey.
This is a great example of how our legislators truly get what it means to embrace complete streets philosophy. Making streets safe for everyone, especially the most vulnerable. Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition worked with AP city council and DOT to move forward to implement the Rt 71 road diet, improving the way traffic flows, and creating a safer, better, healthier environment for people and businesses on Main Street, Asbury Park. This is how we work together.

NJ Bike & Walk Summit!

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition founders will be participating in the NJ Bike Walk Summit on June 5th! Polli Schildge is moderating again this year, and Pam Lamberton will be representing Asbury Park in a FREE virtual Zoom round table discussion with representatives from 9 municipalities in NJ entitled Advocates In Action Part 2: Pandemic And Beyond.

Register and donate:

NJBWC SUMMIT 2021

Drawing on the momentum for change spurred by the pandemic, NJBWC is pleased to offer you the opportunity to learn lessons from communities that took action to open their streets to people, learn more about current Vision Zero, Complete Streets, and equitable mobility initiatives impacting your community, gain insights into different stages of trail development, learn about available public funding sources for your bike/ped projects, and identify strategies to advocate for a more bike and pedestrian friendly and therefore, more livable New Jersey.

 

Tuesday June 1- Saturday June 5

*via Zoom*

Welcome to the Twelfth Annual 2021 New Jersey Bike & Walk Summit, to be held during the week of
June 1 – 5.

The NJBWC Summit is New Jersey’s statewide meeting of bicycle and pedestrian advocates, elected officials and other township leaders, transportation and urban planners, bike shop owners and managers, cycling, walking, fitness and health enthusiasts and experts, recreation, trails and club leaders and others who are interested in making our state a better place to live.

 

Cars Don’t Bring Business. People Do.

ReOpen Asbury Park Returns!

This is the way a city makes space for people, and enables businesses to expand and grow.  Cities all over the world have had plazas and open streets for people to gather, dine, and shop since long before the pandemic. Asbury Park is among these most beautiful and progressive cities.

To allow for the expansion of dining and retail and create a Downtown Pedestrian Zone, the following areas will be open to pedestrians, and closed to through traffic and parking on Friday 4/30 at 1pm:
  • Cookman Avenue from Bangs Avenue to Emory Street – will be open to pedestrians, and closed to through traffic and parking, 7 days a week beginning Friday, April 30, 2021 at 1pm through Monday, November 29, 2021 at 7am.
  • Cookman Avenue from Emory Street to Main Street – will be open to pedestrians and closed to through traffic and parking on weekends beginning Friday, April 30, 2021 at 1pm through Monday, November 29, 2021 at 7am. Parking and through traffic will be prohibited each week from Friday at 1pm through Monday at 7pm.

SCOOTERS LAUNCH IN ASBURY PARK – PRESS RELEASE

LINK E-SCOOTERS TO LAUNCH IN ASBURY PARK, OFFERING A NEW, SAFER, SUSTAINABLE WAY TO GET AROUND ON THE JERSEY SHORE
Superpedestrian’s technologically advanced LINK e-scooters will help the city meet its goals of expanding equitable access to micromobility.
ASBURY PARK, NJ – The Asbury Park City Council on Wednesday night gave final approval to the launch of Superpedestrian’s LINK shared e-scooter service, making it Asbury Park’s exclusive provider for the next three years. The first of 50 silver and bright yellow vehicles will be deployed later this spring growing to a fleet of 250, with a focus on inter-neighborhood access and connections to NJ TRANSIT. Asbury Park is the first New Jersey city served by Superpedestrian’s LINK scooters.
LINK scooters are the smartest, safest and more stable e-scooters in the industry. LINK is the first and only e-scooter with on-board Artificial Intelligence that autonomously performs vehicle maintenance, ensuring every vehicle is safe before every ride. Superpedestrian will host safety workshops and free helmet distribution for residents prior to launching.
To ride a LINK scooter, simply download the LINK mobile app from your iOS or Android app store, and use the app to scan a scooter’s QR code. LINK also has accommodations for riders without smartphones. Rides cost $1 to unlock a scooter plus 35 cents per minute. Asbury Park residents receiving local, state or federal assistance will qualify for a 70 percent discount under
the “LINK-Up” program.
“We are thrilled to offer our LINK scooters to Asbury Park residents,” said William Knapp, VP of Operations at Superpedestrian. “As we continue to live through the COVID-19 pandemic, safe, sustainable, and accessible modes of transport are increasingly important. We look forward to serving Asbury Park residents and visitors to the shore with our unique LINK
scooters, engineered for rider safety and convenient, individualized transport.”
What makes LINK scooters safe and city-friendly:
● LINK’s on-board A.I. Mechanic ensures vehicles are safe before each and every ride
● Geofencing protects pedestrians by keeping scooters out of pedestrian plazas and
other restricted zones
Each LINK scooter has five computers that work together to monitor every component thousands of times per second, instantly self-repair electronic systems, and flag mechanical
components for maintenance if needed. Superpedestrian has launched thousands of LINK scooters across twenty cities, from Seattle to Rome, and has a spotless record of compliance
and safety.
Superpedestrian is seeking input from Asbury Park residents who have suggestions for deployment locations. Community members will be able to submit their ideas and feedback on the company’s Asbury Park website, which will launch in May.
Superpedestrian’s approach is distinguished by a commitment to collaborate with cities. The LINK scooters are equipped with unique geofence technology that enhances compliance with
regulations such as speed limits and no-ride zones.
Superpedestrian also hires locally and employs skilled mechanics, ensuring quality repairs and servicing.
Superpedestrian’s commitment to safety also includes strict personnel procedures and frequent
vehicle sanitation protocols to prevent the spread of COVID. The company will continue to work closely with the city and operational teams to reliably sanitize scooters.
To ride a LINK scooter, simply download the LINK mobile app from your iOS or Android app store. Then locate a scooter via the LINK app. Once you find a scooter, be sure the throttle LED
is GREEN, this means the scooter is available to rent. Then scan the scooter’s QR code (located on top of the handlebars) via the LINK app to unlock. Wait up to 10 seconds for the
throttle LED to turn WHITE, indicating the scooter is unlocked and ready to ride.
About LINK: LINK is the world’s safest and smartest e-scooter. Engineered and built by Superpedestrian, a mobility engineering and technology company that develops and launches
urban transport solutions, LINK scooters are the first to offer self-diagnostic and self-protection technologies that keep riders and pedestrians safe.
Scooter photos and more information available in LINK’s Press Kit: https://www.link.city/press

ASBURY PARK COMPLETE STREETS COALITION SUPPORTS ASBURY PARK AFFORDABLE HOUSING COALITON

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition, APCSC Supports Asbury Park Affordable Housing Coalition, APAHC.
FOR OUR NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS, THIS LETTER NEEDS NO EMBELLISHMENT.
READ AND SHARE
Vote YES on April 20th.
Thank you Bill Mackolin for this beautifully written letter.
THE ISSUE
Asbury Park has an important decision to make on April 20. It will be asked to decide which rent control Ordinance will govern rent transactions for most of the City’s residents. A yes vote will support governance by Ordinance proposed by the Asbury Park Affordable Housing Coalition (Coalition). A no vote will mean that the Ordinance recently adopted by the City Council (Council) will govern. There are big differences between the Ordinances.
This is my comparison of the two Ordinances.
BACKGROUND
Both Ordinances originated from a lingering expressed, but unmet need for tenant rent relief. Coalition, frustrated with progress in discussions with Council petitioned an Ordinance to Council which was defeated. Council then prepared and adopted its own Ordinance on Rent Control. By operation of law the defeated Ordinance now goes before the public for approval on April 20. If approved, Coalition’s Ordinance becomes law. If defeated Council’s Ordinance governs in full effect June 1.
CAVEATS
Council claims their Ordinance is based on a “study” of the issue as it pertains to our city. To date I have not seen nor heard any evidence to indicate that a comprehensive, research based, examination of need and policy response pertinent to Asbury Park has been conducted. Consultants were employed and summarized the policy for the public at a Council meeting.
To the best of my knowledge no council member is a tenant.
Current research clearly indicates that rent control policies can and do regulate the rate of rent increase.
NEED AND PURPOSE OF THE ORDINANCES
The “Whereas” technically known as a Recital in both Ordinances introduce us to the rationale for each Ordinance. Both Ordinances note the City’s extraordinary large percentage of resident who are tenants( more than eight out of ten). Both note the large percentage of renters whose income is at comparatively low , many with income at or below the statistical poverty line. Both take account of the rapid rise of rent expense. Both rely on readily available Information and commonly accepted understandings of these data in stating their rationales for an Ordinance. Coalition’s overriding expressed rationale or expressed purpose is to provide rent relief to tenants. That rationale informs their Recitals. It is their sole reason for petitioning, first to the Council and then to the electorate. Not so in Council’s Ordinance. Council’s Recitals state that residents have a choice among competing Ordinances and allege problems in Coalition’s Ordinance. Council indicates their Ordinance corrects these problems by providing ” flexibility” to home owners and providing “less cumbersome implementation” in their Ordinance. Of significance, in the first paragraph of their Ordinance entitled “Purpose”, Council clearly and unequivocally seeks a balancing of the needs for tenant relief from” housing cost burdens” against the need for” landlords to achieve a reasonable rate of return”.
Council’s Ordinance makes assumptions that are in error. The purpose initiating the Ordinances was to regulate rising rent increases that threaten the stability of a tenant’s home security. A need that was voiced again at a recent Council meeting. Neither Council’s Recitals nor their Ordinance express this purpose as primary and overarching.
Landlord “flexibility” is not defined but a reasonable interpretation would be to provide him with more choice in his pursuit of a” reasonable return”. “Less cumbersome implementation” sounds like a worthwhile objective but it ,too, is in error. The statement appears to be a criticism of the frequent inclusion of standards in policy application in Coalition’s Ordinance. In making this a purpose Council overlooks that “Rent Control” is a new policy for both landlords and tenants. For examples tenants have new rights and landlords are governed by new rules beyond market conditions. There are bound to be disputes particularly its first periods of application. Standards provide the clarification necessary to resolve disputes.
The balancing of needs that Council sees as a purpose creates a “straw man”. Their reference to balance fails to recognize that the power and influence wielded by landlords in a free economy dwarfs that of tenants. Creating a balance is all but impossible. Coalition’s Ordinance in its provisions recognizes landlord’s right to pursue “a reasonable” return. However, their Ordinance governs closely that right through provisions that require him to be “efficient” in his stewardship.
PROTECTION OF RENTERS
Application of Council’s Ordinance to the renter population is very different from that of the Coalition’s legislation. Council’s Ordinance excludes buildings with four or fewer rental units. Using tax records as a basis that exemption excludes at least 1500 units. The Coalition estimates that Council’s legislation omits approximately thirty percent of City rental units. Coalition’s Ordinance does exclude owner occupied dwellings with two or fewer rental units.
The Council has not responded thus far to inquiries regarding the exclusion of so many renters.
RENT INCREASE
In those transactions in which renters remain in the same unit rent increases are regulated in a somewhat similar method in both Ordinances. Both make use of the Consumer Price Index(CPI), a standard economic measure of the costs of goods and services and a frequently used measure in rent control. Again, there are important differences particularly with vacancies. The Coalition’s Ordinance limits annual rent increase to the corresponding increase in the CPI or four per cent whichever is lower. For example if the CPI increases one percent the rent increase is one percent. If the increase in CPI is five percent the increase is limited to four percent. The Coalition’s Ordinance permits its Rent Stabilization Board (Board) to increases where a landlord has shown that an increase is necessary for a fair return (defined) or as the result of certain additional (defined) landlord expenses. It also creates a system that informs tenants of increase and permits them to participate before a decision is made.
The Council’s Ordinance limits annual increases to the increase in the CPI or three and one-half percent. whichever is higher. For example, if the increase in CPI is one percent, rents can increase three and one-half per cent. If the increase in CPI is five per cent, rent can increase five per cent.
Tax appeals resulting in rent expense are divided evenly between tenant(s) and landlord after expense deduction as opposed to Coalition’s Ordinance wherein eighty per cent of the return is paid to the tenant(s) after expense deductions by landlord. Council’s Ordinance grants landlords a right to appeal rent increase granted in order to receive a fair return (defined).
The biggest difference occurs when a renter leaves or is evicted from a unit and a vacancy occurs. Under Council’s Ordinance landlords are not limited in the rent they may charge a subsequent renter. There are no exceptions for a rent increase due to a vacancy in Coalition’s Ordinance. The exception created in Council’s Ordinance is very troublesome because it can incentivize some landlords to create vacancies for increased profit and, in general, it drives rent costs higher.
BOARDS OF ADMINISTRATION
Both Ordinances include a governing Board. In Coalition’s Ordinance it is called “Rent Leveling and Stabilization Board” (Board) and in Council’s Ordinance it is called “Rent Leveling Board” (Board). Their duties are generally similar and both have a strong hand in the administration of their respective Ordinance. Each Board has an executive officer who is responsible for implementing Board decisions within their policy’s frameworks. There is a significant difference in Board membership. Coalition’s Ordinance provides for seven members, three landlords and four tenants. each appointed by the Mayor and approved by the Council. It further provides that for a decision to be made there must be at least as many tenant representatives voting as there are landlord representatives.
Council’s Ordinance provides for a seven member Board appointed by the Council with not fewer than two tenants and two landlords, the balance of members appointed by the Council. Council’s Ordinance leaves to considerable chance that tenants will ever represent a majority point of view on a powerful Board making critical decisions about their housing.
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION
If Rent Control as policy is judged on its ability to promote stability for residents in rent controlled units, research has found it successful. Relying on locally pertinent data both Ordinances herein identify a need to provide rent relief to residents who are overwhelmingly tenants, not property owners or landlords. The Recitals or introductions to each Ordinance express very different rationales and purposes.
Coalitions Ordinance is driven primarily by a need to provide relief to tenants amid significantly increasing rent expense.
Council’s Ordinance expresses the purpose of providing relief to tenants but adds others. In its criticism of the competing Ordinance, Council’s Recitals include the purposes of adding “flexibility” to home owners and “less cumbersome implementation” to their Ordinance.
Of special note is their additional purpose of balancing renter’s need for relief against that of the landlord for a “reasonable return”. In Council’s Ordinance neither the inclusion of “flexibility” making it easier for landlords to achieve a” reasonable return” nor the “balancing “of renter’s needs for relief against landlord’s needs as purposes takes account of the enormous advantage in power and influence that landlords have over tenants in any so described “balancing” of needs.
Indeed the term “balancing” as used seems fanciful because in a free economy it is probably impossible to achieve. Arguably, property owners also now have a notable advantage in financial “flexibility” over most renters. Their purpose of “less cumbersome implementation” no doubt is a criticism of the Coalition’s frequent use of standards to guide implementation of Ordinance provisions. Council fails to appreciate the need for standards in the application of a policy including new rights of participation for tenants and new responsibilities for landlords governed heretofore primarily by market conditions. Fewer standards will very likely lead to more complications and delay in resolution of disputes.
Collectively these purposes drive Council’s Ordinance.
Coalition’s Ordinance protects many more tenants than does Council’s legislation. The difference thus far is without explanation by Council. While facially similar to Coalition’s provisions governing rent increase through the application of the CPI, Council’s Ordinance by it’s exception for “vacancies” leaves rent increases without limit.
Each Ordinance provides for a Board authorized to administer its stated policies. Board membership is set forth for in each Ordinance. Coalition’s Ordinance establishes a Board membership that favors tenant’s needs and guarantees tenants at least equal representation with landlords in all Board decisions. Council’s Ordinance does neither.
If you believe tenant’s need for rent relief and a stabilized rental market is important now and in the near term you should vote YES to Coalition’s Ordinance in the referendum on April 20. If you believe that same need is not that important you should vote NO.
Respectfully,
William D. Mackolin
Asbury Park

Want To Learn About E-Scooters?

E-Scooters And E-Bikes – The Future Of Mobility Or Safety Risks On Wheels?

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition stands behind efforts to reduce car dependency to promote human health, the health of our city, and the health of our planet. Most residents see the benefits of promoting micro mobility such as electric scooters, and of course they support bicycle riding to enable people to get around without cars for daily trips, and for visitors to enjoy and support businesses in our city. Sadly some others have reacted negatively on social media to the introduction of scooters in Asbury Park.  They are apparently in the thrall of auto industry influence to keep our streets flooded with cars (whether they’re gas powered, electric, or autonomous). They seem to be unable to get past the (low) incidence of crashes, they focus on “scary” encounters with scooter (and bike) riders, they neglect to acknowledge 40K deaths by car each year, and have abject fear of anything new on our streets. For historical context, here’s a fun history of cars in the early 1900’s. *

*Note that the term “accident is used throughout the article. This  journalist/historian seems to be unaware that use of “accident” was promoted by the auto industry to take the onus off drivers. “Accident” implies unavoidable. They are all crashes. #crashnotaccident.*

Read this excellent article in Forbes, and the study on e-scooters globally. This is only one of many dozens of articles in the past several years, and more during Covid, available to those who would like to learn about the future of mobility across the world. The current US administration supports building infrastructure in cities for people to get around without cars. We can build our city, Asbury Park to be resilient, healthy, and possibly car-free within the decade, but only if we have the will to do so.

For more for excellent, in-depth information, see this article from Forbes.

Excerpts:

A new report published by the International Transport Forum (ITF), a Paris-based intergovernmental organization with 60 member countries within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), examined how the rapid proliferation of micro-vehicles could be safely integrated into existing urban traffic patterns to help ensure that micro-vehicle riders and pedestrians would not become crash victims.

The “Safe Micromobility” report found that motor vehicles are involved in 80% of fatal crashes with e-scooters and bicycles.

The report offers ten recommendations to help policy makers, city planners, administrators, operators and manufacturers ensure the protection and well-being of all.  Read on…

 

Excerpts:

new report published by the International Transport Forum (ITF), a Paris-based intergovernmental organization with 60 member countries within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), examined how the rapid proliferation of micro-vehicles could be safely integrated into existing urban traffic patterns to help ensure that micro-vehicle riders and pedestrians would not become crash victims.

“Innovation in micromobility may bring new crash risks,” Alexandre Santacreu, a road safety policy analyst for the ITF and principal author of the report, said in a video statement. “But if we understand those risks, we can counter them.”

Here are some additional findings from the study:

  • E-scooter riders do not face significantly higher risk of road traffic death or injury than cyclists.
  • Traffic will be safer if e-scooter and bicycle trips replace travel by car or motorcycle.
  • The fast-paced evolution of micro-vehicles challenges governments to put in safety regulations in place that take into account the future of all mobility.

“Street design must also serve the safety of those using micro-vehicles,” Santacreu added. Making it safe creates an opportunity for “shaping a sustainable urban mobility landscape.”

Read for more in-depth information in this article from Forbes.

CALL TO ACTION: NEED YOUR COMMENTS

REVISE THE MANUAL ON UNIFORM TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES! 
To our supporters: Many may not realize that there is a manual governing how our roads are designed, which is to prioritize the expedited movement of motor vehicles, NOT for the safety of people. It’s called the Manual On Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD). It’s outdated and related to, if not responsible for many of the problems on our streets today.
A large population in Asbury Park, and all over the US are  is directly affected by streets that are not designed for people. We need to change this. We need streets that are safe for the most vulnerable road users.
This graph from the last census shows the numbers of people who walk and bike to work – everyone deserves equitable mobility.
 
Please read about the initiative to rewrite the MUTCD and add your comment.  You can copy and paste the text below (or write your own comment) on the Transportation For America page, and click on “submit your comment” where you can also post on the Regulations.gov site.
MUTCD Revision:
Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition supports America Walks. And I personally care deeply about my community, Asbury Park, NJ, and neighboring communities in the Jersey Shore area.The MUTCD is an obstacle to human activity by prioritizing the level of service for vehicular traffic, and must be completely revised to change the way roads and streets are designed.I join America Walks and other groups to ask that U.S. DOT perform a comprehensive overhaul of the MUTCD, centering on safety and equity. We need a rule book that is designed to support healthier, safer communities, that:
  • Ensures every urban and suburban signalized intersection has basic pedestrian infrastructure, like curb ramps, pedestrian signal heads that display “Walk” and “Don’t Walk” messages and crosswalks.
  • Sets speed limits based on safety, not based on how fast drivers can speed through our cities and towns.
  • Gives local residents a voice in what kind of infrastructure is needed.
  • Gives engineers flexibility to design streets that are safe enough for children, and all vulnerable users to navigate.I join America Walks in asking that FHWA reframe and rewrite the MUTCD, creating a path for guidance that aligns with the equity, safety, and sustainability goals of American cities, as well as those of the Biden Administration.
Thank you,
Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition