NJ Bike & Walk Coalition Summit Sessions Are Ready To View!

In case you were not able to attend the Summit this year, here’s your chance to see these great presentations. Every session offered opportunities to learn ways to make our cities safer, more livable, accessible, and more equitable for everyone.

Friends and supporters will want to check out the session Advocates In Action Part 2: Pandemic And Beyond, presented at the NJBWC Summit on June 5th, which includes two founding members of Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition, Moderator Polli Schildge (http://apcopmpletestreets.org editor), and Pam Lamberton. In this session a panel of nine advocates shared ideas, initiatives, and frustrations.

The panelists gathered materials, graphics, videos, and valuable information for this engaging session of the 2021 Summit. We’re looking forward to continuing these conversations!

 

Check out all of the NJ Bike &Walk & Summit Sessions!

 

Advocates In Action Part 2: Pandemic And Beyond

Bike/ped advocates have long been champions of social equity, accessibility, health, and sustainability. Since the pandemic, people all over the world are finally recognizing what the advocates have known all along – to achieve these values, it is critical to reduce automotive dependency, offer safe and convenient alternatives to driving, and to think differently about how we use our valuable public space.

Using this momentum, we are reimagining our streets, neighborhoods, and business districts as places not just for cars, but for all people. In this session, hear experiences from advocates around NJ followed by the opportunity to ask questions of panelists about how they’ve succeeded – or are still working- to build better places for people.

 

  Polli Schildge, Moderator, Founding Member, Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition
  Anthony Talerico Jr., Mayor of the Borough of Eatontown
John Sullivan, President, Bike & Walk Montclair
.  Kathleen Ebert, Founder, Point Pleasant Borough Complete Streets
Kenny Sorenson, Advocate, Neptune Complete Streets
Lisa Serieyssol, Chair, Princeton Pedestrian & Bicycle Advisory Committee
Nancy Blackwood, Chair, Red Bank Environmental Commission/Green Team
Pam Lamberton, Founding Member, Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition
Shaun Ellis, Founding member of Ride Free, a transportation gap project by Free Bridge Mutual Aid
Todd Pagel, Former Councilman, City of Metuchen & President of Bike Walk Metuchen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACTION! NJ Needs A 4′ Safe Passing Law!

Help us pass the SAFE PASSING LAW!

 

Summer is here, and those of us walking or wheeling – riding bikes or scooters or other wheeled conveyances are at the mercy of drivers who are inattentive, distracted, or aggressive.

Right now, NJ is one of only 8 states without a law telling drivers how to pass us SAFELY.  NJ does have a law about how to pass a horse and rider safely, but none for the rest of us.

Copy and paste the messages below into your email, personalize with your town and your name, and send to New Jersey Senator Stephen M. Sweeney and Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin to urge them to move the NJ Safe Passing Law to Governor Phil Murphy’s desk for signature as we enter the height of the summer season and the increased risks to vulnerable road users.

The state Assembly Law and Public Safety committee ultimately passed the law  by a 6-1 vote. It’ll now proceed to the Assembly Speaker for further consideration.

NJBWC will now be leading a campaign to move the bill through the Assembly and onto the floor of the State Legislature.

COPY AND PASTE AND EMAIL:

Senator Stephen M. Sweeney: SenSweeney@njleg.org

Dear Senator Sweeney,
RE: SENATE COMMITTEE SUBSTITUTE FOR
SENATE, Nos. 2208, 1460, and 1463
STATE OF NEW JERSEY
219th LEGISLATURE
 ADOPTED MAY 20, 2021
As a resident of [town], I write to urge you to post the NJ SAFE PASSING bill for a full vote ASAP.
We’re now in the 100 deadliest days of the year for walkers, wheelers and bicyclists. This law will save lives and prevent serious injuries.
Please help move the bill to the Governor’s desk for signature as we enter the height of the summer season and the increased risks to the thousands of adults and children who will be out walking, running, riding their bicycles, wheeling on scooters and skateboards and sharing NJ roads with drivers of cars and trucks.
This law will make clear to drivers and non-driver users alike the safest way to pass—and share—NJ’s roads. The law will help drivers learn to safely pass us, our families and friends who are out on our busy roads to get to work or school, to shop or dine and to improve their health.
We need your support in making this the year NJ begins to better protect all road users with clear, enforceable guidelines about when—and how—to pass the most vulnerable on our roads by slowing down, moving over if possible and, if not, passing no less than four feet from walkers, wheelers and bicyclists.
[Name, email, town]

Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin: asmcoughlin@njleg.org

Dear Speaker Coughlin,
        RE: ASSEMBLY COMMITTEE SUBSTITUTE FOR
ASSEMBLY, Nos. 5570, 5571, and 5656
STATE OF NEW JERSEY
219th LEGISLATURE
 ADOPTED JUNE 2, 2021
As a resident of [town], I write to urge you to post the NJ SAFE PASSING bill for a full vote ASAP.
We’re now in the 100 deadliest days of the year for walkers, wheelers and bicyclists. This law will save lives and prevent serious injuries.
Please help move the bill to the Governor’s desk for signature as we enter the height of the summer season and the increased risks to the thousands of adults and children who will be out walking, running, riding their bicycles, wheeling on scooters and skateboards and sharing NJ roads with drivers of cars and trucks.
This law will make clear to drivers and non-driver users alike the safest way to pass—and share—NJ’s roads. The law will help drivers learn to safely pass us, our families and friends who are out on our busy roads to get to work or school, to shop or dine and to improve their health.
We need your support in making this the year NJ begins to better protect all road users with clear, enforceable guidelines about when—and how—to pass the most vulnerable on our roads by slowing down, moving over if possible and, if not, passing no less than four feet from walkers, wheelers and bicyclists.
[Name, email, town]

The New Jersey Bike And Walk Summit 2021: June 1st through June 5th

 

The NJBWC Summit is New Jersey’s statewide meeting of bicycle and pedestrian advocates, elected officials and other township leaders, transportation and urban planners, bike shop owners and managers, cycling, walking, fitness and health enthusiasts and experts, recreation, trails and club leaders and others who are interested in making our state a better place to live.

Drawing on the momentum for change spurred by the pandemic, NJBWC is pleased to offer you the opportunity to learn lessons from communities that took action to open their streets to people, learn more about current Vision Zero, Complete Streets, and equitable mobility initiatives impacting your community, gain insights into different stages of trail development, learn about available public funding sources for your bike/ped projects, and identify strategies to advocate for a more bike and pedestrian friendly and therefore, more livable New Jersey.

Register for sessions at the Zoom New Jersey Bike & Walk Summit June 1st through June 5th

The final session of the Summit at 9:30am on June 5th features panelists from nine cities and towns in NJ, including Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition representative! This editor is happy to be moderating a panel again this year,  Advocates in Action Part 2: Pandemic and Beyond.

Panelists from these nine municipalities will share inspiration, ideas and implementation of ways they have worked to enable people to move about their cities and towns safely during the pandemic. They will speak about how they have engaged with city leaders, the focus on equitable access, and plans to maintain these spaces in the future, for the health of residents and visitors, and for the health of the planet.

Register for Summit sessions individually here.

Register for Summit sessions individually here.

 

NJ Bike & Walk Summit!

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition founders will be participating in the NJ Bike Walk Summit on June 5th! Polli Schildge is moderating again this year, and Pam Lamberton will be representing Asbury Park in a FREE virtual Zoom round table discussion with representatives from 9 municipalities in NJ entitled Advocates In Action Part 2: Pandemic And Beyond.

Register and donate:

NJBWC SUMMIT 2021

Drawing on the momentum for change spurred by the pandemic, NJBWC is pleased to offer you the opportunity to learn lessons from communities that took action to open their streets to people, learn more about current Vision Zero, Complete Streets, and equitable mobility initiatives impacting your community, gain insights into different stages of trail development, learn about available public funding sources for your bike/ped projects, and identify strategies to advocate for a more bike and pedestrian friendly and therefore, more livable New Jersey.

 

Tuesday June 1- Saturday June 5

*via Zoom*

Welcome to the Twelfth Annual 2021 New Jersey Bike & Walk Summit, to be held during the week of
June 1 – 5.

The NJBWC Summit is New Jersey’s statewide meeting of bicycle and pedestrian advocates, elected officials and other township leaders, transportation and urban planners, bike shop owners and managers, cycling, walking, fitness and health enthusiasts and experts, recreation, trails and club leaders and others who are interested in making our state a better place to live.

 

What is a Slow Street? NJDOT Doesn’t Get It.

NJDOT ignores need for social distancing, favoring 1950’s era policy

Asbury Park Complete Streets Coalition has joined with NJ Bike & Walk Coalition and The Bicycle Coalition Of Greater Philadelphia, and advocates in other communities to sign a letter to tell Governor Murphy:

Allow Slow Streets for Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety.

 

Asbury Park rolled out our Slow Streets plan quickly in an effort to enable people to walk, ride bikes, and move about in the city safely during the pandemic. It was a fast, but not so well-communicated effort. An explanation of Slow Streets was included at the end of the ReOPEN Asbury Park pilot for community and business recovery in June. It was disbanded in July.
Some businesses and residents didn’t understand it, and some were not fully invested in the idea. People driving into the city to do business were confused.
Plastic road barriers were utilized, and no actual signage to explain their meaning.
Slow Streets and Open Streets are intended to be welcoming to people, improve business, (not just during a pandemic but ALWAYS), and enable people to utilize city streets safely, without danger from motor vehicles. In almost every scenario all over the world Slow Streets  improve cities, by making livable streets, and improve businesses by creating walkable neighborhoods. It didn’t quite happen that way in AP,  so our Slow Streets were put on hold.
But NOW, even if AP were to re-evaluate and desire to reinstate our Slow Streets initiative, there is an effort on the part of NJDOT to shut down ALL Slow Streets in NJ based upon a 1955 AG formal opinion. Read on…
During the COVID-19 pandemic, New Jersey residents are increasingly accessing the streets as a means to safely get out of the house and exercise to maintain their physical and mental health. In urban neighborhoods bicycling and walking have been seen as viable alternatives to short transit trips.
But our roads are not safe for vulnerable road users — this year, while overall traffic fatalities are down slightly in New Jersey, bicycle and pedestrian fatalities are up and now represent 40% of all traffic deaths. In our urban areas sidewalks are too crowded for safe social distancing.
That’s why we are calling upon the Governor issue an executive order to allow communities to designate slow streets. Slow streets are designated to alert motorists that they are sharing the road space with cyclists, pedestrians, and children.
Read and sign the letter to NJ Governor Murphy.
If Governor Murphy responds and DOT reverses this decision, Hopefully AP will reinstate the Slow Streets program with community input and creative communication.
Examples of welcoming Slow Streets signage: