Dangerous By Design Letter: Health And Safety Risk On Memorial Drive

While we are listening intently to news about containing the Covid-9 virus, and trying to stay safe and healthy, there is an ongoing problem with a local county road which needs to be addressed as a serious health and safety issue.
This story about Good Samaritans in the Asbury Park Press on March 18th needs to bring focus to the deadly Monmouth County Rt 40A, Memorial Drive, which is dangerous by design.
Please read the letter dated today, March 25th, 2020 to the Asbury Park Press from Kenny Sorenson, resident of Neptune City, bike/walk advocate, father, grandfather, aka musician, “Stringbean”:
 
Dear Austin,
 In response to your brief article about another bicyclist run over by an S.U.V. on Rt. 35 in Neptune, I would like to suggest that you further investigate the plight of bicycle riders and pedestrians in Asbury Park and Neptune.
 
While A.P. has recently made safety improvements with bike lanes and a Main St. “road diet”, Neptune lags far behind. The danger to vulnerable road users is both a public health and a social justice issue.
 
Please consider contacting the people involved with the grassroots organization known as “Asbury Park Complete Streets”. They, along with Asbury’s transportation director, have made great strides in pedestrian and bike access and safety. Contrast that with the failures of Neptune and Neptune City.
 
A road like Memorial Drive, that is maintained by Monmouth County is dangerous by design. It functions as a kind of “mote” to keep undesirables on foot, namely people without cars who live in Neptune, from entering the exclusive shore communities of Avon-by-the-Sea and Bradley Beach.
 
The Asbury Park Press is a car culture newspaper with aa suburban bias. You Mr. Austin have a unique opportunity to change that.
 
Please feel free to call me. I would also be happy to take a walk or ride a bike with you when we are free to do so.
 
Sincerely,
Ken Sorensen
Neptune City

Dangerous By Design 2019

READ THIS REPORT.

Our cities are overrun by motor vehicles, and more people being killed outside of cars. Fewer drivers and passengers are being killed due to improved safety standards inside vehicles, but auto makers are building fewer cars in favor of large SUVs and trucks which kill people at a much higher rate.

We will continue to work to make streets safe for people walking and riding bikes, scooters, in pedicabs, and with any other alternative modes of transportation in Asbury Park.

“The last two years on record (2016 and 2017) were the most deadly years for people killed by drivers while walking since 1990.

This is happening because our streets, which we designed for the movement of vehicles, have not changed. In fact, we are continuing to design streets that are dangerous for all people. Furthermore, federal and state policies, standards, and funding mechanisms still produce roads that prioritize high speeds for cars over safety for all people.”

Between 2008 and 2017, drivers struck and killed 49,340 people who were walking on streets all across the United States. That’s more than 13 people per day, or one person every hour and 46 minutes. It’s the equivalent of a jumbo jet full of people crashing—with no survivors—every single month.

READ ALL ABOUT IT HERE:

https://smartgrowthamerica.org/dangerous-by-design/

From Dangerous By Design – to Safe by Design!

A user-friendly guide to things that any city can do to make it safe and more livable.

February 6, 2019

24 THINGS CITYMAKERS MUST DO STAT TO DESIGN FOR OUR LIVES!

“…we took our best stab at distilling the vastly important Smart Growth America, Dangerous by Design report into what we believe are the main takeaways, both in terms of the key evidence-based findings and the critical design and policy guidance that came out of the report. We also aimed to translate these directives into specific, actionable urban design recommendations that citymakers must – and can – start implementing STAT.

Together, we can go from Dangerous by Design to Safe by Design! Let’s do this thing.

Read about it…

http://www.stateofplace.co/our-blog/2019/1/safe-by-design-t8n9s