What is Tactical Urbanism? An International Movement

“Cities around the world are using flexible and short-term projects to advance long-term goals related to street safety, public space, and more.”

APCSC and other Complete Streets advocates believe that streets are for people. We know that even with best intentions cities sometimes miss opportunities, or are financially challenged to effect changes away from car-centric streets.  We can get creative to make streets into places for people: for health, for social well-being, for the environment, and for economic benefit.

Tactical Urbanism is all about action. Also known as DIY Urbanism, Planning-by-Doing, Urban Acupuncture, or Urban Prototyping, this approach refers to a city, organizational, and/or citizen-led approach to neighborhood building using short-term, low-cost, and scalable interventions to catalyze long-term change.

Learn about it:

http://tacticalurbanismguide.com/

What Does Vision Zero Mean?

Learn about Vision Zero from Jerry Foster of Greater Mercer TMA in an article discussing the meaning of VZ as it relates to safer streets in Princeton and in NJ. Aren’t streets and roads designed for safety…or are they primarily designed to expedite cars?

Vision Zero: A Comprehensive Re-Thinking of Road Safety

At the local level some safety advocates have recognized the urgency of the situation (National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) study showing an increase in pedestrian deaths), and are taking up the cause. Below, Jerry Foster of the West Windsor Bicycle & Pedestrian Alliance outlines Vision Zero, a safety plan that has been effective in other countries that activists are trying to bring to New Jersey.

What Is Vision Zero?

It’s not just another blame-the-victim (and enforcement) safety campaign! Vision Zero is a comprehensive re-thinking of road safety that brings everyone to the table to systematically prevent crashes and reduce crash severity — just like airline and railroad crashes.

Read more…

https://princetoninfo.com/vision-zero-a-comprehensive-re-thinking-of-road-safety/